MIAA Hits Back At Airlines

In Your Face Proof shows airlines at fault for flight delay

14 April 2015

As it turned out airlines were at fault for flight delays at Ninoy Aquino International Airport, data from Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines disclosed.

The Manila International Airport Authority (MIAA) General Manager Jose Angel Honrado told airline management the in-your face facts when he met with airline companies Friday last week to address flight delays that was always blame with MIAA.

As it turned out, airline companies failed to fly their flight schedules on time that was provided to them by Airport Coordination Philippines, an airport slot allocator.

Manager Honrado presented the daily logs of airlines coming to Manila from terminal approach to landing and clearance delivery for departure to validate his claim and it showed delays either departure or arrivals.

Honrado stressed the remedy could be extending flight turn around time from the current 45 minutes to one hour.

CAAP has already issued a guidelines extending flight turn around time from 30 minutes to 45 minutes in 2013 but this directive seems to be inadequate as what has been happening during the Christmas holiday rush in 2014.

Cebu Pacific (CEB) blamed the airport authority for the delays in December but data showed that their services feel short of standards forcing the Civil Aviation Board (CAB) to penalized the airline 52 million pesos for flight delays. The airline did not appeal the ruling of the Board and has since paid the government penalty sum.

Honrado cannot understand why CEB has always been complaining and finger pointing the airport authority to their passengers since January of this year when the airline itself suffers delay in dispatching its aircraft for first flight.

From a three-day average in January this year, 27 flights were delayed during the first wave only. This caused an average of 103 delayed flights for the rest of the day. Similarly, 10 delayed flights were recorded from a three-day average in February causing 45 delayed flights throughout the day.

“Should the first wave of flights from 4am to 7am be delayed, this will also affect succeeding flights of the day,” he explained.

Cebu Pacific admitted that flight delay is caused by prolonged aircraft servicing on the ground and late arrival of their aircraft from its point of origin.

There were a total of 236,442 flights arriving and departing in NAIA with an average of 648 flights a day.

11 comments:

  1. Yep, that would be great if flight coming into Manila gets a continuous approach to landing and not get vectored all over NCR due to the single landing runway environment. Flights from domestic destinations flying to Manila also gets delayed departure clearance even if they arrived on time and filed their clearance as scheduled. This results to additional delay of the aircraft for their next flight (I assume this was the data the CAAP points out that the delay was not their fault). Additional delays results to runway congestion out of Manila again specially during peak times.
    In addition, if you notice flights going to Kalibo, I'll bet my per diems that the only flight that doesn't get delayed out of Manila would be the morning flights, after that expect departure delays that would take an hour in some cases.

    And it's all the airlines fault. And they want to build a new terminal.

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    1. Indeed. When will these idiots realize only a new airport with at least two parallel runways will fix this?

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  2. Being a frequent flier with 70 flights per year, I can say with all certainty that the delays are caused by the ground staff of airlines, from check in, to the worst gate handling systems in the world, bad facilities also at fault though, to air bridge operators, baggage handlers, cargo handlers, etc.

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    1. I would love to explain it to you why you are wrong, but since you said you flew almost 70 flights a year, i guess it would still be impossible for you to understand it. Try flying more than 100 flights a year. Then you might probably get a hint.

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    2. As much as some of the flights may be due to some ground reasons, this comes as out as an exemption rather than the norm. Source: Me. 25 flights per month in the driver's seat.

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    3. @Anonymous 2 saying that Anonymous 1 should fly more than 100 flights a year, all I can say is that you are arrogant.

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    4. @anonymous1. Yes i may be arrogant. But atleast I know what is realy happening. Your POV is clearly on the passenger side while I is more on operation where we happen to see most of it all. Youre probably one of those persons who has this sense of entitlement that you deserve more than what you pay for. probably one of those people who thinks travelling to somewhere via business class on a less than a 90minute trip matters and gives you importance. So just please shut up and listen to what I have to say and buckle your seatbelts when i turn on the seatbelt sign. You dont know everything okay



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  3. Honrado learned a great deal from the administration.

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  4. Interesting that the airport administration sits and points fingers while passengers still deal with crazy lines and poor management of passenger flow. All of which are preventable. From a passenger perspective - these guys have no idea how to run an airport. How can they possibly get it right on the aircraft ops side?

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  5. I am thinking the delays are a combination of more things than we care to admit, including, of course, administrative insufficiency. How about contracting a third party concessionaire like Changi Airports Group (I'm not sure if they do concessions, but something similar) to run NAIA. I'm assuming the transfer of expertise would be easier once the concession expires. Wouldn't it be a win-win situation if the airport is whipped into shape, passengers finally have an idea where their terminal fees and travel taxes go, CAG earns a little bit and the government gets its cut?

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  6. I agree with the above Changi, Hong Kong International Airport and the Narita Airport Authority all have experience running world class operations. Having one of them manage NAIA would make a world of difference. The facilities are fine - if they were properly managed, the airports would be profitable and world class.

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